BBC World Service research: how to reach young online audiences in different economies

The BBC has released the findings from research it undertook to discover how young online audiences in emerging economies differ to those in developed economies, and how that influences the way in which they seek, consume and engage with news.

Read Caroline Scott, www.journalism.co.uk

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BBC World Service research: how to reach young online audiences in different economies

Apollo seeks purchase of Tribune — and possible California sell-off

Politico Media :: Apollo’s interest marks the next chapter in the ongoing saga of Tribune Publishing’s future. Broad, the Los Angeles-based businessman and philanthropist, first told Tribune Publishing of his interest in buying its California News Group, consisting of the LA. Times and San Diego Union-Tribune, in early September.

Read Ken Doctor, www.capitalnewyork.com

Apollo seeks purchase of Tribune — and possible California sell-off

Apollo seeks purchase of Tribune — and possible California sell-off

Politico Media :: Apollo’s interest marks the next chapter in the ongoing saga of Tribune Publishing’s future. Broad, the Los Angeles-based businessman and philanthropist, first told Tribune Publishing of his interest in buying its California News Group, consisting of the LA. Times and San Diego Union-Tribune, in early September.

Read Ken Doctor, www.capitalnewyork.com

Apollo seeks purchase of Tribune — and possible California sell-off

Agencies love Periscope, but Twitter fails to capitalize

Digiday :: Agencies are saying Periscope is the next big thing, but Twitter has been inconsistent when it comes to pushing it at them. For Twitter, plagued with growth problems, the live streaming app certainly feels like a bright spot. But Zach Gallagher of Deutsch has felt that despite the creative possibilities of Periscope, Twitter is underselling it.

Read Shareen Pathak, digiday.com

Agencies love Periscope, but Twitter fails to capitalize

Research shows mainstream media don’t do follow-up reporting to see if civilians are killed in US drone strikes

Truth-out :: When US officials are confronted with too-strong evidence of civilian casualties, they typically issue an apology (while not usually admitting civilians were actually killed), promise an investigation – and then that’s the last we ever seem to hear of it in the mainstream press.

Read John Hanrahan, www.truth-out.org

Research shows mainstream media don’t do follow-up reporting to see if civilians are killed in US drone strikes